Cemetery

Name Phone E-Mail
Sexton - Laurie Halliwell (330) 939-9907 lhalliwell@guilfordtwpoh.com

Mound Hill Cemetery
Main Street / Seville Road
Seville Ohio 

Mound Hill Cemetery is the oldest continuous operating cemetery Medina County. This cemetery has space available to accommodate casketed and cremated remains. 

Acreage: 19.194
Number of Burial Spaces Developed to Date:  8946
Number of Developed Burial Spaces Available:  976

Established as a pioneer cemetery, the original plat of Mound Hill was surveyed, and conveyed by deed to Guilford Township for burial purposes in 1824. The grounds ascend gradually from the road, north, to the mound from which the cemetery takes its name. The mound itself, is thought to be one of Ohio's ancient Indian burial grounds. The spot has long been considered consecrated earth, and sacred to their memory.

Mound Hill serves as the final resting place of hundreds of area pioneer settlers, and includes numerous veterans of the Revolutionary War through the battles of this century. The first burial was that of Harriet Wilson, wife of Robert Wilson, who arrived in 1821. She was the first adult to perish in the Seville settlement. Mrs. Wilson was born in 1797, and died 9 Jun 1824, at the age of 27 years 5 months. She was laid to rest near the highest elevation. In 1826, John Cook, a forty-one year old newcomer, died soon after arriving from the East. He was the first white man laid beneath the sod of the new cemetery. Here, the Eastman, Allton, Harris, Leland, Gleason, Welch, Norton, Corwin, Stoakes and Harkness families memorialized their loved ones who passed prior to 1824. Also interred are the world renown Giants of Seville, Captain Martin Van Buren Bates, his wife, Anna Haining (Swan) Bates, and their infant son, Babe.

 For many years it was but an ordinary country graveyard, with nothing about it to attract attention except its natural beauty. Members of early families maintained and decorated the grounds from inception until an ordinance to provide for the regulation, protection, and keeping in repair the Cemetery of the Village of Seville passed on the 16th day of July 1866. In 1867, the authorities of Seville had the grounds regularly laid out into lots, walks and drives. Trees were ordered from Cleveland, and arrived by way of freight train. And the whole enclosed by an Osage hedge, with appropriate gates. Soon after, sales of large family plots were offered by public auction. By 1881, several acres had been added by way of purchase, the drives graded, and two rows of evergreen hedge surrounded the mound. A stone stairway leading from Main Street, and iron fencing with brick posts were added thereabout. The cemetery footprint has since been enlarged. The western sections of the cemetery were acquired in 1943, 1964, and 1966. Sales commenced in 1945, Maude (Miller) Freeman was the first to be interred on the 20th day of April. The eastern most row of section three was bestowed by George F. Freudiger in 1948. A new maintenance garage was constructed, which was enlarged in 2008. A brick chapel was erected in 1996, and the village of Seville held a dedication ceremony on Labor Day 2003 for the new granite entrance memorial.

 The cemetery is under the direction of the Mound Hill Cemetery Board of Trustees. Inquiries should be directed to the Mound Hill Cemetery Sexton or the Cemetery Clerk. The Board of Trustees direct the general care and custody of the property and grounds of the cemetery, the control and direction of all subordinate officers and workmen employed therein. In addition, they shall adopt and approve rules and regulations affecting the rights of proprietors and the conduct of the visitors of the cemetery. The Sexton has general charge of sales, interment and disinterment services, and memorials. The sexton shall keep such books of record, make such reports and perform such other duties appropriate to the office as the Trustees may require. The grounds maintenance department has general charge of perpetual care services.

Visitation Hours
Open daily dawn to dusk 

Floral and Ground Regulations
Cemetery policies are conspicuously posted and readily visible to the public. 

Pets are not permitted in the cemetery.

Decorations, annual and/or  perennial plantings may be placed within 18” of the memorial. They will be removed when they become unsightly or when it becomes necessary to facilitate cemetery operations. All winter decorations must be removed by April 1st. Summer decorations must be removed by October 15th.

Breakable objects, granite or marble chips are not permitted.

No shrubs or trees may be planted without prior approval by the Mound Hill Cemetery Officials. 

Driving Directions
GPS Coordinates – Latitude: 41.0108, Longitude: -81.8539

Google Map Link

From the West – Lodi – Take I-76 East to Exit 2 (SR-3, Seville). Turn right onto SR-3. Turn left at the third traffic light on to East Main Street. Drive approximately 1 mile, and the Cemetery is on the left.
From the North – Cleveland – Take I-71 South to I-76 East (exit 209). Then follow the Lodi Directions.

From the South – Columbus – Take I-71 North to I-76 East (exit 209). Take I-76 East to Exit 2 (SR-3, Seville). Then follow the Lodi Directions.

From East – Akron – Take I-76 / SR-224 West to Exit 7 (SR-57, Rittman). Turn left onto SR-57. Turn right at the second traffic light onto Seville Road. Travel 5.3 miles. Cemetery is on the right.

From the Southeast – Canton or from Akron - Canton Airport – Take I-77 North to SR-224. Travel West on SR-224; will merge with I-76. Then follow Akron Directions.

River Styx Cemetery
8101 River Styx Road
(River Styx) Wadsworth, Ohio 

River Styx Cemetery has very limited space available to accommodate casketed and cremated remains.
Number of Burial Spaces Developed to Date:  752
Number of Developed Burial Spaces Available:  28

Location in Township: Section 29 Mid Part of SE Quarter
 

Established as a pioneer homestead graveyard in 1821 by the David Wilson family, who were among the early settlers of Medina County, and the first to settle the township of Guilford. Today, the cemetery serves as the final resting place of hundreds of area pioneer settlers, and includes veterans of the Revolutionary War through the battles of this century. 

In 1816, David Wilson, accompanied by his brother John, came to Medina County, and together they started a clearing in the northeastern part of Guilford Township, the site long bore the name “Wilson’s Corners.” The first marriage in the township was celebrated 15 Dec 1818, Abigail Porter becoming wife of David Wilson. Their union extended over a period or nearly fifty years, her death occurring 19 Jul 1866. David Wilson, aged 90 years, 7 month, and 1 day, died on 23 Nov 1884. 

The first recorded burial in River Styx Cemetery is that of Elijah Porter, a grandfather of Mr. Wilson’s wife, Abigail. Mr. Porter, a veteran of the American Revolutionary war, was born on 12 Dec 1757, and died shortly after arriving at Wilson’s corner in 1821. The spot became consecrated earth, and sacred to the memory of him. Family members and others of that neighborhood were laid to rest beside him.

In 1844, there having been several cases of grave-robbing, the citizens constructed quite a large receiving vault in the cemetery. This vault is still in good condition, and is the only one of the kind in Guilford Township. A local journalist writes of this event, “One bizarre story is that one of the local residents enthusiastically kept the Wadsworth medical college supplied with laboratory material by grave-robbing. It was so bad that residents began burying their dead in out-of-town cemeteries with the result that David Wilson built a stone vault with a triple plank door in the village graveyard so the dead could rest in peace.” [Article: Places of the Past Remain As Memories, Medina County Sun Newspaper, 2 Aug 2001]. The incidents were hampered, but the thieves managed to damage the oak vault doors on several occasions. Mr. Wilson contracted an area blacksmith to design and construct an iron gated door, which remains today. Trees were planted, the grounds were enclosed with Osage hedge, and an Iron fence with triple gates was installed along the frontage of the cemetery.

The River Styx Cemetery Association was established in 1911 to maintain records, provide perpetual care, and direct services. On 1 March 1933, the association purchased the former River Styx Methodist Church edifice. Constructed in 1850, the 1288 square feet structure measures 28x46’.

In 2005, the four remaining members of the River Styx Cemetery Association made the decision to disband, sell the church edifice, and escheat the cemetery grounds to Guilford Township. In November 2005, the former church edifice was sold by way of public auction. Soon after, the association learned that they could not obtain title insurance because they had never filed with the state as a non-profit organization. In order to consummate the sale, the association formed an Ohio Non-Profit Corporation in January 2006. The said property title transferred 18 Jan 2006. The newly formed corporation acted as a conduit for the purposes of gifting monies from the said sale, to the Guilford Township Trustees, with which to provide perpetual care for the River Styx Cemetery. In May 2006, the Corporation was in the process of dissolution. The members voted to gift any remaining funds to the township, namely the Board of Trustees.

The cemetery is currently under the direction of the Guilford Township Board of Trustees, who direct the general care and custody of the property and grounds of the cemetery. A physical street address was obtained, and the cemetery was registered  with the Ohio Department of Commerce Division of Real Estate and Professional Licensing on 24 April 2007. The Cemetery Sexton has general charge of all  sales, interment services, and memorials.

Floral and Ground Regulations
Cemetery policies are conspicuously posted and readily visible to the public. 

Motorized Vehicles are not permitted in the cemetery.

Pets are not permitted in the cemetery.

Decorations, annual and/or  perennial plantings may be placed within 18” of memorial at any time of the year. They will be removed when they become unsightly or when it becomes necessary to facilitate cemetery operations. All winter decorations must be removed by April 1st. Summer decorations must be removed by October 15th.

Breakable objects, granite or marble chips are not permitted.

No shrubs or trees may be planted without prior approval by the Cemetery Officials.

Visitation Hours
Open daily dawn to dusk, parking is limited 

Driving Directions
GPS Coordinates – Latitude: 41.0539434, Longitude: -81.7979114

Google Map Link 

From the West – Lodi – Take I-76 East to Exit 7 (SR-57, Rittman). Turn right onto SR-57. Turn left on to River Styx Road. Cemetery is approximately 1 mile down on the left.

From the North – Cleveland – Take I-71 South to I-76 East (exit 209). Then follow the Lodi Directions.

From the South – Columbus – Take I-71 North to I-76 East (exit 209). Take I-76 East to Exit 7 (SR-57, Rittman). Then follow the Lodi Directions.

From East – Akron – Take I-76 / SR-224 West to Exit 7 (SR-57, Rittman). Turn right onto SR-57. Turn left on to River Styx Road. Cemetery is approximately 1 mile down on the left.

From the Southeast – Canton or from Akron-Canton Airport – Take I-77 North to SR-224. Go West on SR-224; will merge with I-76. Then follow the Akron Directions.

 

Cemetery Records

Visitors to Mound Hill and River Styx often inquire about the number of interments in the cemeteries. For many years the commonly accepted number was derived from a list compiled from the records of sextons and caretakers. The exact number of the graves was not certain due to deterioration of many original wooden grave markers, as well as damaged records and incomplete lists. However, in recent years, studies have been conducted which indicate there were more burials in the cemeteries than the numbers previously mentioned.

Beginning in 2007, cemetery interment records, dating from 1867 (Mound Hill), 1907 (River Styx), and vital information obtained from Ohio death certificates, family registries, early military records, federal census reports, and the Social Security Administration was compiled. In addition, family information was acquired from historical works. Generally verified from other sources, but in some cases, the writers were obliged to depend upon tradition alone, and may thus have sanctioned some errors. 

These more complete records have been entered into data bases and are now available for viewing by appointment. To view to the list of interments, visit Fina-A-Grave.com. Please Note: The Find-A-Grave database contains memorial entries contributed by members of the public. Therefore, the information may not reflect data discovered in Mound Hill and River Styx Cemetery records. We welcome your additions and corrections.

Mound Hill Cemetery at Find-A-Grave.com

River Styx Cemetery at Find-A-Grave.com